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Contributed by Cambridge University Library
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annotation p 266
     271
     285
     295
     300
     303, 5, 9
     315
     319
     322
     324, 6, 8, 9
     342, 5
     352 ,4
     370
     385
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annotation N.B. I have not attended to variations in normal abortive parts


annotation      (M-Tandon)    (V. Back First for N.B

annotation 19
     20
     25
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annotation 29— How then are flowers in fern-leaved Beech Irish yew &c &c
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annotation 30
     37
     42
     —44
     47
     50, 3, 4, 6, 8
     60 , 2, 5 6, 8, 9
     73, 7, 9
     85    ■
     91   
     113, 4, 6
     121, 2, 4, 6 to 130
     132 to 146
     154 to 159
     163, 6 to 192
     197
     213, 4, 6, 9—
     221, 25, 29
     235, 6
     252, 4
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annotation (1

annotation 30 Varieties, i.e. slight ■modifications rarely congenital
        p. 114. idem
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annotation 42    Mountains destroy colour sometimes (Q)t01
t01 - `(Q)' in brown ink over pencil
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annotation    to 58 a good deal about striped flowers & fruit

annotation 61    effects of good soil on villosity, & low elevation (Q)t01
t01 - `(Q)' in brown ink
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annotation 68    Atrophy of organ often causes villosity of Part

annotation 73 Fleshiness of leaves caused by proximity to sea (Q)

annotation 113 «X»t01 Monstrosity of axil almost always affects the parties appendiculaires (Q)
t01 - `X' in reddish-orange crayon

annotation 115 Monstrosities more common under cultivation than in state of nature.

annotation 116 «(Qt01 Monstrosities, are generally normal in some other species.
t01 - `(Q)' in pale pencil

annotation 121 319 } organs arrested «& rudimentary» at different ages of evolution & hence more or less rudimentary.

annotation 124 «(Q)» organs often repeated are most variable in form.
     Isidore G. St. Hilaire.t01
t01 - `Isidore G ... Hilaire.' in brown ink

annotation 126    in Maize a return to supposed primitive form.
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annotation 128    comparison of rudiments of stamens to normal rudiments in other flowers

annotation 138 140 156}«—(Q)» case of monstrosity analogous to other species —(Q)t01
        167    ✔    173. goodt02
t01 - `—(Q)' in dark pencil
t02 - `✔    ... good' in blue crayon

annotation 156 Believes in Balancement., 158 (Q)

annotation 163 changes of form when organ become rudimentary

annotation 168 variation of “Piment annuel” see Vilmorin Catalogue
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annotation 172 174 analogous variation in most distinct plants; crinkled leaves.
     ✔t01
t01 - `✔' in blue crayon


annotation (2

annotation 189    great tendency■ in irregular flower to become regular (or peloric) ■— this is return to ancestral structure ? p 191. hereditary — generally sterile.    Why ?— see further, for the peloric flowers retake their normal structure.

annotation 212    Monstrosity analogous to other allied genus

annotation 221    in Malus apetala all stamens converted into pistils
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annotation 225 Rudiments normal of parts.

annotation 248 266}. on soldering of homologous parts (Q)t01
t01 - `(Q)' in pale pencil

annotation 285    on trunk of tree with nuts & acorns in solid wood ( & Birds nests — Loudon Journal.)t01
t01 - `& Birds ... Journal.)' in brown ink

annotation 309    Deplacement vry rare monstrosity, as in animals

annotation 323 342} «(Q)» Monstrosity analogous to another genus in Family

annotation 327 «(Qt01 Linnaeus on plants wh. lose corolla in Arctic regions
t01 - `(Q)' in pale pencil

annotation 352    Return in stamens to normal number, even «when rudiment not present»t01
t01 - `even «when ... present' in pale pencil

annotation 353    Remarkable hereditary Capsella bursa pastoris
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annotation 385    Description of the St-Valery apple
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